Bernard Miller   I grew up in Kirkwood, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis. For the last 25 years I have worked for Synopsys, a company that makes Computer Aided Design (CAD) software for integrated circuit design. I became interested in Astronomy when my son had an astronomy project in junior high school. He had to check out a telescope and find various deep sky objects. I hooked him up with the local astronomy club and we went to one of their star parties so he could do his project. We enjoyed it so much we bought a Celestron CPC 1100 and started going to the local star parties. One day someone showed me how to take pictures with my telescope, and the rest, as they say, is history. My work has been featured in Astronomy Magazine, APOD, and at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. I received the second place award in the Galaxy category in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest in 2017.

Bernard Miller

I grew up in Kirkwood, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis. For the last 25 years I have worked for Synopsys, a company that makes Computer Aided Design (CAD) software for integrated circuit design. I became interested in Astronomy when my son had an astronomy project in junior high school. He had to check out a telescope and find various deep sky objects. I hooked him up with the local astronomy club and we went to one of their star parties so he could do his project. We enjoyed it so much we bought a Celestron CPC 1100 and started going to the local star parties. One day someone showed me how to take pictures with my telescope, and the rest, as they say, is history. My work has been featured in Astronomy Magazine, APOD, and at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. I received the second place award in the Galaxy category in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest in 2017.

 
Mark Hanson   Mark Hanson has been an amateur astrophotography for 25 years. He first started out with a local group in Wisconsin, but soon realized the need to move to darker skies. That led him to Dark Sky New Mexico in Animas, NM where he runs his telescope and equipment remotely. Mark's work has been featured in the Albuquerque Museum, Astronomy Magazine, APOD, and at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. He received the first place award in the Robotic Telescope category through Astronomy Photographer of the Year in 2014. All photos are shot at DSNM in Animas, NM.

Mark Hanson

Mark Hanson has been an amateur astrophotography for 25 years. He first started out with a local group in Wisconsin, but soon realized the need to move to darker skies. That led him to Dark Sky New Mexico in Animas, NM where he runs his telescope and equipment remotely. Mark's work has been featured in the Albuquerque Museum, Astronomy Magazine, APOD, and at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. He received the first place award in the Robotic Telescope category through Astronomy Photographer of the Year in 2014. All photos are shot at DSNM in Animas, NM.

Howard Anderson   I had wanted to be an astronomer since the 4th grade. DSNM allows me to fulfill my lifelong dream of doing astronomy. I live in the Phoenix, AZ area where the Phoenix light dome is visible for 300 miles. I can see only about 20 stars where I live. DSNM provides truly dark skies which are essential to doing serious astrophotography. Being able to operate my telescope and camera remotely from anywhere where I have an internet connection is ideal for me since I now live in an apartment with no place to set up a telescope. I started doing astrophotography in 1994 using film. I became a "ham" radio operator when I was 14 and built most of my own equipment. I have an MS in mathematics, half an MS in physics, and have been a software engineer all my life. So, while not essential to doing astrophotography at DSNM, I have found that my knowledge of electronics, software, math and physics have helped immensely. And I still have opportunities to learn! I have been working on improving my image processing skills but still have a long way to go. Other astronomers that are part of DSNM have been willing to share their methods and techniques and that helps a lot.

Howard Anderson

I had wanted to be an astronomer since the 4th grade. DSNM allows me to fulfill my lifelong dream of doing astronomy. I live in the Phoenix, AZ area where the Phoenix light dome is visible for 300 miles. I can see only about 20 stars where I live. DSNM provides truly dark skies which are essential to doing serious astrophotography. Being able to operate my telescope and camera remotely from anywhere where I have an internet connection is ideal for me since I now live in an apartment with no place to set up a telescope. I started doing astrophotography in 1994 using film. I became a "ham" radio operator when I was 14 and built most of my own equipment. I have an MS in mathematics, half an MS in physics, and have been a software engineer all my life. So, while not essential to doing astrophotography at DSNM, I have found that my knowledge of electronics, software, math and physics have helped immensely. And I still have opportunities to learn! I have been working on improving my image processing skills but still have a long way to go. Other astronomers that are part of DSNM have been willing to share their methods and techniques and that helps a lot.

T. Lee   I’ve been interested in amateur astronomy since I was in elementary school. Having lived only in big cities, however, severely curtailed my astronomy ventures to the occasional stargazing trips to barely dark sites (Bortle 5-6). Recent advances in sensors, fast optics, and narrowband filters had allowed me to attempt imaging in my Bortle 9 backyard in New York City. The results were encouraging, but I could only image for several hours every month between the constraints of time, work commitment, weather, and moon phases. Setup and tear-down of the imaging equipment took as much time as I could gather photons during every session.  DSNM not only provides access to the darkest skies but also the convenience of a permanent setup, ready to go on moment’s notice. Imaging sessions can be planned remotely during the bus commute (through my smartphone!), and I enjoyed more imaging time the first month there than in my previous year at home. My equipment gets used every clear, moonless night as opposed to spending most of its time in the house. I’m still very much a novice in image processing but DSNM makes data collection fun and easy.

T. Lee

I’ve been interested in amateur astronomy since I was in elementary school. Having lived only in big cities, however, severely curtailed my astronomy ventures to the occasional stargazing trips to barely dark sites (Bortle 5-6). Recent advances in sensors, fast optics, and narrowband filters had allowed me to attempt imaging in my Bortle 9 backyard in New York City. The results were encouraging, but I could only image for several hours every month between the constraints of time, work commitment, weather, and moon phases. Setup and tear-down of the imaging equipment took as much time as I could gather photons during every session.

DSNM not only provides access to the darkest skies but also the convenience of a permanent setup, ready to go on moment’s notice. Imaging sessions can be planned remotely during the bus commute (through my smartphone!), and I enjoyed more imaging time the first month there than in my previous year at home. My equipment gets used every clear, moonless night as opposed to spending most of its time in the house. I’m still very much a novice in image processing but DSNM makes data collection fun and easy.

Gregg Ruppel   Gregg Ruppel lived in St. Louis for most of his life, but relocated to Tucson in 2017. He worked as the Director of the Pulmonary Function Laboratory at St. Louis University Hospital for 34 years and retired in 2013. Gregg has been interested in astronomy since the early sixties and owns several telescopes. He began imaging in 1997 when he built a CB245 CCD camera and now uses the SBIG STL11000M. Gregg has been capturing his images at DSNM since 2016. Gregg is also a member of the Eureka Observers Club, the St. Louis Astronomical Society, Astronomical Society of Eastern Missouri (ASEM), and the Tucson Amateur Astronomy Association (TAAA)

Gregg Ruppel

Gregg Ruppel lived in St. Louis for most of his life, but relocated to Tucson in 2017. He worked as the Director of the Pulmonary Function Laboratory at St. Louis University Hospital for 34 years and retired in 2013. Gregg has been interested in astronomy since the early sixties and owns several telescopes. He began imaging in 1997 when he built a CB245 CCD camera and now uses the SBIG STL11000M. Gregg has been capturing his images at DSNM since 2016. Gregg is also a member of the Eureka Observers Club, the St. Louis Astronomical Society, Astronomical Society of Eastern Missouri (ASEM), and the Tucson Amateur Astronomy Association (TAAA)

 
Al Acker   Bio coming soon!

Al Acker

Bio coming soon!

Bernard Miller   I grew up in Kirkwood, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis. For the last 25 years I have worked for Synopsys, a company that makes Computer Aided Design (CAD) software for integrated circuit design. I became interested in Astronomy when my son had an astronomy project in junior high school. He had to check out a telescope and find various deep sky objects. I hooked him up with the local astronomy club and we went to one of their star parties so he could do his project. We enjoyed it so much we bought a Celestron CPC 1100 and started going to the local star parties. One day someone showed me how to take pictures with my telescope, and the rest, as they say, is history. My work has been featured in Astronomy Magazine, APOD, and at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. I received the second place award in the Galaxy category in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest in 2017.

Bernard Miller

I grew up in Kirkwood, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis. For the last 25 years I have worked for Synopsys, a company that makes Computer Aided Design (CAD) software for integrated circuit design. I became interested in Astronomy when my son had an astronomy project in junior high school. He had to check out a telescope and find various deep sky objects. I hooked him up with the local astronomy club and we went to one of their star parties so he could do his project. We enjoyed it so much we bought a Celestron CPC 1100 and started going to the local star parties. One day someone showed me how to take pictures with my telescope, and the rest, as they say, is history. My work has been featured in Astronomy Magazine, APOD, and at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. I received the second place award in the Galaxy category in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest in 2017.

Dan Crowson   Dan Crowson is the head of IT for a national telecommunications equipment reseller headquartered in Chesterfield, Missouri. Dan’s interest in astronomy started with a Tasco that he can’t ever remember seeing anything through. After a long hiatus, he took a couple of college classes on astronomy and purchased a telescope in 2011. After not being able to see much because of light pollution, he started taking images. Dan currently heads up the Imaging SIG for the Astronomical Society of Eastern Missouri and has over 160 images published. “Dark Sky New Mexico is the premier astronomy site for astronomers with or without a budget. You can’t beat the value or the skies,” he says.

Dan Crowson

Dan Crowson is the head of IT for a national telecommunications equipment reseller headquartered in Chesterfield, Missouri. Dan’s interest in astronomy started with a Tasco that he can’t ever remember seeing anything through. After a long hiatus, he took a couple of college classes on astronomy and purchased a telescope in 2011. After not being able to see much because of light pollution, he started taking images. Dan currently heads up the Imaging SIG for the Astronomical Society of Eastern Missouri and has over 160 images published. “Dark Sky New Mexico is the premier astronomy site for astronomers with or without a budget. You can’t beat the value or the skies,” he says.

Brian Ottum   Brian Ottum was bitten by the astronomy bug at age 12 when he saw the full moon turn orange (a lunar eclipse). Brian is a bit of an astronomy polymath, with accomplishments in visual observing, outreach, research and imaging. He’s volunteered at Bryce Canyon National Park, showing the night sky to thousands of visitors and started a telescope observing program for the Detroit Public Schools. His astrophotography has been featured in International Dark Sky Association’s calendar, the cover of Reflector Magazine, and Sky & Telescope among others. “Each time I visit DSNM I marvel at the inky-black skies, quietness and closeness to space,” he shares.

Brian Ottum

Brian Ottum was bitten by the astronomy bug at age 12 when he saw the full moon turn orange (a lunar eclipse). Brian is a bit of an astronomy polymath, with accomplishments in visual observing, outreach, research and imaging. He’s volunteered at Bryce Canyon National Park, showing the night sky to thousands of visitors and started a telescope observing program for the Detroit Public Schools. His astrophotography has been featured in International Dark Sky Association’s calendar, the cover of Reflector Magazine, and Sky & Telescope among others. “Each time I visit DSNM I marvel at the inky-black skies, quietness and closeness to space,” he shares.